Lonesome Roads and Streets of Dreams: Place, Mobility, and Race in Jazz of the 1930s and 40s

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Jazz in American Culture. Burton W. Annie J. The New Blue Music. Richard J. Better Git It in Your Soul. Krin Gabbard. Oscar Peterson. Gene Lees. Freedom Sounds. Ingrid Monson. Birds of Fire. Kevin Fellezs. Hidden in the Mix. Diane Pecknold. When Genres Collide.

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Professor Matt Brennan. Powerful Voices. Joshua S Duchan. Experimentalism Otherwise. Benjamin Piekut. Experiencing Jazz. Segregating Sound. Ronald Radano. Girl Groups, Girl Culture. Jacqueline Warwick. Music, Movies, Meanings, and Markets. Morris Holbrook. Fascinating Rhythm. David Yaffe. The Fierce Urgency of Now. Daniel Fischlin.

The Penguin Jazz Guide. Brian Morton. A Boy Named Sue. Reds, Whites, and Blues. William G. Really the Blues. Mezz Mezzrow. Jazz Collins Need to Know? Bob Blumenthal. New Atlantis. John Swenson. The Cambridge Companion to Jazz. Mervyn Cooke. A Love Supreme.

Ashley Kahn. This Is Our Music.

Lonesome Roads and Streets of Dreams… by Andrew S. Berish (2012)

Iain Anderson. Hi-de-ho:The Life of Cab Calloway. Alyn Shipton. Tony Whyton. Cultural Codes. Bill Banfield. The Improvisation Studies Reader.

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Dick Weissman. Glorious Days and Nights. Herb Snitzer. Encyclopedia of Great Popular Song Recordings. Steve Sullivan. Bob Gluck. Categorizing Sound.

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Lonesome Roads and Streets of Dreams: Place, Mobility, and Race in Jazz of the 1930s and '40s

David Brackett. The Oxford Handbook of Country Music. Travis D. Gypsy Jazz. Michael Dregni. People Get Ready. Rob Wallace. Cross the Water Blues.

Neil A. Jazz in the s. Bill Shoemaker.


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Lonesome Roads and Streets of Dreams By Andrew S | Trade Me

Howard Reich. Berish explains both the distance the protagonists had to each other as well as the sometimes extremely contrasting effect the music industry and their audiences had on their individual status and success. By concentrating on swing music we witness the two black and two white jazz musicians making different experiences with regard to place, modes of travel and meeting with audience expectations. Many ballrooms also had a recording room where live broadcasts were produced and hence a sense of place then was additionally conveyed by the radio, and people thousands of miles away suddenly experienced their own peculiar sense of place even though they were merely tuning in to a radio station.

And naturally all the other features of mobility mentioned earlier are interrelated.

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We today have to keep in mind that in the era described jazz music was the sound of the day, with music charts and the entertainment sectors of the whole country full of jazz music. And Basie, Miller and Ellington were superstars while jazz in the 30s and 40s could mean hot jazz, swing, sweet jazz, or pop tunes disguised as jazz performed by mostly all-white bands in countless hotel lounges. It is because jazz played such a prominent role that many interesting conclusions about American popular culture and the changing social environment represented by Berish survived.

Many recollections, memories, biographies and anecdotes of the jazz life luckily are preserved on paper as well as on shellac.

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